Gerken

Gerken, L, & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). The beginning of cross-sentence structural comparison by 9-month-olds. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/CrossSentence.pdf

Age:9 mo

Description: Forty-eight 9-month-olds were tested on two types of stimuli. Alternating Structure stimuli comprised pairs of sentences that contained the same subject NP but exhibited different structures (S-V-NP and S-V-S). Same Structure stimuli comprised pairs of sentences that contained the same subject NP and exhibited the same sentence structure (either S-V-NP or S-V-S). The results showed that infants preferred Alternating over Same Structure stimuli, but this preference was only significant when the Same Structure stimuli were S-V-S.

 

Houston

Houston, D.M., Tincoff, R., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). 7.5-month-olds' memory for words after a 1-week delay. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Memory.pdf

Age:7.5 mo

Description: In this study, we investigated the possibility that infants can retain information about the sound patterns of words for up to one week.

 

Houston

Houston, D., Jusczyk, P.W., & Jusczyk, A.M. (2003). Memory for bisyllables in2-month-olds. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Syllable.pdf

Age:2 mo

Description: Used High-amplitude sucking procedure to investigate 2-month-olds' memory for sets of four bisyllables that share a common syllable. Examined the effect of stress and position of the shared syllable on infants' memory for the bisyllables.

 

Johnson

Johnson, E. K., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Exploring possible effects of language-specific knowledge on infants’ segmentation of an artificial language. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/LangSpecific.pdf

Age:8 mo

Description: We familiarize English-learning 8-month-olds with the same language used by Johnson and Jusczyk (2001). During the test phase, infants are tested on their listening preferences to two types of stimuli: 1) the first two syllables of a statistical word, 2) the last two syllables of a statistical word.

 

Johnson

Johnson, E. K., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Exploring statistical learning by 8-month-olds: The role of complexity and variation. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/complex.pdf

Age:8 mo

Description: We familiarize English-learning 8-month-olds with a modified version of the artificial language used by Saffran et al. (1996). However, the language used in the current study contains words of variable length. Results indicated that infants failed to segment this more complex type of artificial language. Thus, the results of the current study suggest that we must expand our accounts to ask how infants’ statistical learning prowess could be realistically applied in the domain of early word segmentation.

 

Johnson

Johnson, E., Jusczyk, P.W., & Ramus, F. (2003). The Role of Segmental Information in Language Discrimination by English-learning 5-month-olds.

In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Segmental.pdf

Age:5 mo

Description: We test the hypothesis that English-learning infants can discriminate English and Dutch even when the segmental cues to language identity have been removed.

 

Jusczyk

Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). American Infants’ Perception of Cues to Grammatical Units in Non-native Languages and Music: Evidence from Polish and Japanese. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Polish.pdf

Age:6 mo

Description: The Headturn Preference Procedure is used to examine young infants’ sensitivity to clausal units in languages with different prosodic and syntactic properties. The degree of tuning to the input language in the performance of these tasks is then assessed. In addition, infants’ performance with non-language stimuli is also assessed in order to ascertain which aspects of performance are linguistic in origin and which are more general properties of learning about auditory stimuli.

 

 

Mandel-Emer

Mandel-Emer, D., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003).What’s in a Name?: How Infants Respond to Some Familiar Sound Patterns. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Name.pdf

Age:4.5 mo

Description: Using the headturn preference procedure, we explored the changing nature of infants' name representations and their potential use in attaining other language-processing milestones. Experiments 1 - 3 explored the specificity of name representations and infants' responsiveness to other socially-salient items. Experiments 4 - 6 moved beyond recognition of socially-salient patterns, and tested the effects of
name recognition in on-line processing, such as name detection in fluent
speech contexts and its potential role in to segmenting other words. Results suggest that names may be special lexical items which are recognized earlier and in more detail than other words during early stages of language learning.

 

Nazzi

Nazzi, T., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Infants' segmentation of verbs from fluent speech. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Age:10-16 mo

Description: The study focused on the segmentation of bisyllabic verbs having a weak/strong stress pattern (the predominant pattern of verbs in English) or strong-weak stress pattern (the predominant pattern of words in general in English). Infants were familiarized with instances of two verbs, and then tested on their recognition of these items embedded in passages.

 

Newman

Newman, R., Tincoff, R., Charles-Luce, J., & Jusczyk, P.(2003). Children's cluster productions. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Cluster.pdf

Age:24 mo

Description: This project was designed to investigate two possibilities in 24mo cluster reductions: One is that when children make cluster reduction errors, they really mean to include the missing sounds, but have not developed the motor skills sufficient to produce them correctly. The second possibility is that children are unaware that the sound should have been included. Thus, the present study examines such reduced clusters to determine whether "tar" (meaning "star") is produced differently from when the child actually intends to say "tar."

 

Newman

Newman, R., Tsay, J, & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). The development of speech segmentation abilities. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Develop.pdf

Age:7.5 mo

Description: Children were presented with approximately 5 hours of videotaped exposure to Mandarin Chinese prior to visiting the laboratory. They then were tested in the same procedure as that of Tsay and Jusczyk, using stimuli in Mandarin. If this amount of exposure is sufficient for infants to begin acquiring segmentation skills, we would expect that infants in the present study would perform better at the segmentation task than did infants without such exposure (those in the prior study by Tsay and Jusczyk).

 

Newman

Newman, R. S., Jusczyk, P. W. & Howe, M. (2003). The effect of previously learned words on children’s
acquisition of similar word forms. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/SimilarWords.pdf

Age:24 mo

Description: The present study examines whether already-learned word forms might influence children’s acquisition of new words. Twenty-four children, aged two years, were taught the name of an object. In a subsequent session, they were taught the names of two new objects, one of which had a similar word form to (or was a neighbor of) the original word. We investigated whether children were more (or less) likely to learn the name-object link for the similar word than for the dissimilar word.

 

Santelmann

Santelmann, L., Soderstrom, M., Jusczyk, P., & Jusczyk, A.M. (2003).18-month-olds’ sensitivity to discontinuous dependencies over long verbs. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Discontinuous.pdf

Age:18 mo

Description: The present studies were designed to examine whether 18-month-old infants were sensitive to the relationship between is and –ing over multisyllable verbs. However, one problem with using multisyllabic verbs to test this relationship is that multisyllabic verbs are relatively rare in spoken English, and are thus likely to be unfamiliar to very young infants.

 

 

Santleman

Santelmann, L., Jusczyk, P., & Huber, M.(2003). Infants Attention to Affixes. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Affix.pdf

Age:9-20 mo

Description: The present study explored 9- to 20-month-old infants’ sensitivity to affixes by examining their responses to commonalties present in words with common syllabic affixes. For each experiment, lists of bisyllabic items were constructed so that experimental lists contained items that shared a common element (such as a suffix). The control lists were composed of bisyllabic items which contain no common syllables. We hypothesized that if infants detected a regularity among the items in the experimental lists, such as common suffixed elements, they would listen longer to these lists than to the control lists. Experiments 1, 3 and 4 examined 9- to 20-month old infants' sensitivity to common suffixes, while Experiment 2 examined 9-month-olds sensitivity to prefixes.

 

Smolensky

Jusczyk, P.W., Smolensky, P., Arnold, K., & Moreton, E. (2003). Acquisition of Nasal Place Assimilation by 4.5-month-old Infants. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Nasal.pdf

Age:4.5 mo

Description: Infants 4.5 months of age are hypothesized to be in the "initial state" for acquisition, which in Optimality Theory means their grammars rank all markedness constraints above any faithfulness constraints. We investigated their sensitivity to nasal place assimilation as a means of comparing two versions of OT: the standard version of Alan Prince and Paul Smolensky, and the "Targeted OT" of Colin Wilson.

 

Tincoff

Tincoff, R., & Jusczyk, P.(2003). Do Six-Month-Olds Link Sound Patterns of Common Nouns To New Exemplars? In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Common.pdf

Age:6 mo

Description: Previous work (Tincoff & Jusczyk, 1999) demonstrated that 6-month-olds can link the sound patterns "Mommy" and "Daddy" to video images of the appropriate parents, but do not attach these words to unfamiliar men and women. Using a preferential looking procedure, the current study extends these findings by showing that 6-month-olds can attach sound patterns of the familiar spoken words (“Hands” and “Feet”) to instances of these referents that they had never seen.

 

Tincoff

Tincoff, R., & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003).Are Word-Final Sounds Perceptually Salient for Infants? In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/CutCup.pdf

Age:7.5 mo

Description: Using the HPP, this study extended Jusczyk and Aslin (1995) by familiarizing 7.5-month-olds with nonwords (e.g., [beyp]) and then presenting test passages containing words that differ from the nonwords in their final consonant (e.g., 'bike', [beyk]) along with new unfamiliar words. The infants did not false alarm to the test passages containing the similar sounding words. Our results suggest that infants have detailed phonetic representations of familiar sound patterns.

 

Tsay

Tsay, J, & Jusczyk, P.W. (2003). Detection of Words in Fluent Chinese by English-acquiring and Chinese-acquiring Infants. In D. Houston, A Seidl, G.Hollich, E. Johnson, & A. Jusczyk (Eds.) Jusczyk Lab Final Report. Retrieved from http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk.

Link to pdf: http://hincapie.psych.purdue.edu/Jusczyk/pdf/Detect.pdf

Age:7.5 mo

Description: Do infants need to know the language to recognize the familiar word patterns in continuous speech? Specifically, after being familiarized with words in a foreign language, will they detect them in the fluent speech of that language?

 

For more information on any of the studies or original stimuli and data files contact ghollich@purdue.edu.

Lab members may access the repository directly via ftp, smb, or afp at hincapie.psych.purdue.edu.